Why can’t all software be like Sublime Text?

Most software sux, but there are exceptions, gems that make me believe that not all is lost. Sublime Text 2 is one great example (and I don’t get paid to say so). There are great many places online where you can learn about its features, this post isn’t one. I want to focus on what makes Sublime Text make me love it when I hate most software:

It’s sophisticated yet simple. In its core it’s just a text editor. Yet it has tabs, colored syntax, auto-complete, excellent regexp support, go-to-definition capability, snippets, multi-line selection and million other features that make you love it. It’s all there but it doesn’t manifest itself unless you say so.

It’s centered around you and your work. It doesn’t enforce it’s own workflow (think ‘create project’ from some IDEs). It doesn’t ask stupid questions (try closing an editor with 10 unsaved documents, you will get 10 stupid dialog boxes, 0 in Sublime Text 2). It remembers where you left your work and just gets there when started again.

It’s blistering fast. It pops up immediately – no splash screen, no questions asked. It opens and parses 150K lines of xml in just below 3 seconds (and that’s on my non-SSD PC!) and you can edit and navigate it smoothly without waiting for anything.

It’s extensible. There are hundreds of plugins and you can write your own if you know python.

It’s truly cross-platform. I’m regularly using Sublime Text 2 on Linux and Windows, with exception for some key-bindings it’s exactly the same piece of software. And a single license covers them all!

It’s elegant.

Other software like that: Blender, Firefox, Chrome, XBMC… Gosh why this list is so short?

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